The USB of the future: it will more than double its power capacity to 240W

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1622049771 619876 1622050890 rrss normal.jpg

A future update to the USB-C standard will take power transmission between devices to another level. And it will take levels of up to 240 watts, an improvement that can allow you to connect devices that require a lot of power to the universal port, such as gaming laptops, 4K monitors and printers. The jump in maximum power is more than double the current 100 watt capacity. The USB of the future: it will more than double its power capacity to 240W The USB Implementers Forum (USB-IF), the industry group that develops the technology, unveiled new power levels in version 2.1 updates on Tuesday of the USB Type-C specification. The USB-IF did not immediately provide any comment. The new 240-watt option is called Extended Power Range, or EPR. USB started out as a useful but limited port for connecting keyboards, mice, and printers to computers. Later, it displaced Firewire and other ports, as their higher speed allows it to perform the most demanding tasks. They came in handy for charging phones with the start of the mobile revolution, paving the way for their use to save energy, not just data. The 240W extended power option means USB can extend its range again. Cables that support 240W will have additional requirements to accommodate new levels. The USB-IF said in the specification document that the USB-IF would require cables to carry specific symbols “so that end users can visually confirm that the cable supports up to … 240 watts.” It will be a breakthrough 240W capacity is enough to power larger displays, printers, gaming laptops and other devices. The Dell UltraSharp 32-inch 4K monitor has a maximum power use of 230W, let’s say, the same level as HP’s 17-inch gaming laptop. USB-C is a relatively new set of oval ports and reversible cables, a design that means you no longer have to worry about the plug side. The design also means that the same cable works on phones, tablets, and computers. The USB-C specification is not the only one that covers the operation of USB ports and cables. The current USB 3.2 and the brand new USB 4 control how data is sent over cables, while USB Power Delivery controls how devices negotiate with chargers and other devices. >