The Electoral Commission opens an official investigation into the reform of Boris Johnson’s apartment

They point out that there are “reasonable grounds to suspect that there may have been one or more infractions” of the financing rules in the works.

The British Electoral Commission, the independent agency that controls among other things the financing of political parties, announced on Wednesday the opening of an investigation into the reform of the Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s official apartment in Downing Street.

A spokesman for the commission told the media that there are “reasonable grounds to suspect that there may have been one or more infractions” of the financing rules in the works to prepare the official floor of the prime minister.

The supervisory agency is in contact with the Conservative Party about the origin of the funds “since the end of March”, the spokesperson said, and in light of the information received so far it has decided “to continue this work as a formal investigation.”

“The investigation will determine whether any transaction relating to the works at 11 Downing Street falls within the regime regulated by the Commission and whether any financing was reported properly,” he added.

Johnson will appear from 12.00 local time (11.00 GMT) before Parliament to undergo the weekly session of answering the questions of the deputies, where he is expected to offer explanations about how the apartment renovation was paid that he and his partner, Carrie Symonds, occupy in the official residence.

So far, the Conservative Party has refused to clarify whether it paid the cost of the reform and has limited itself to saying that “party funds are not being used to pay for the apartment”, without specifying whether Johnson received an undeclared loan .

Johnson’s former adviser and Brexit “mastermind” Dominic Cummings accused the prime minister of having sought “donors to pay secretly” for the renewal and assured that he warned him that this would be “possibly illegal”.